Archive for the ‘Africa’ Category

Jamaica’s Raheem Sterling has been voted the 2019 Footballer of the Year by the Football Writers’ Association, less than a day after his peers voted him the PFA young player of the year.

Sterling has scored 29 goals for Manchester City and England this season, including a hat-trick for England in the opening Euro 2020 qualifier against the Czech Republic, while also helping England’s squad reach this summer’s Nations League finals in Portugal.

The awards also reflect Raheem’s courage to challenge preconceptions and fight racism, which will leave a legacy not just for future generations in football but society as a whole. As a black immigrant in England, Raheem has been the subject of many racist and xenophobic attacks along with being exposed to many victims of such attacks.

He has faced these attacks and played Football with class, grace & bravery. The Jamaican footballer has become an inspiration while playing great football. The Jamaican who now lives in England plays for the English national team and Manchester City.

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MIAMI BROWARD CARNIVAL IS RIGHT ON TIME

Jennifer Lovell from NY masquerader for Dingolay mas band

Jason Walker

Carnival, the largest physical manifestation that has been exported worldwide, is up South Florida again. The Miami Broward One Carnival will happen Sunday the 7th of October in 2018. The timing of the Carnival is perfect with the backdrop of the USA having issues with the immigrant population (which over 90% of the US population is either born outside of the US or is the descendant of someone born outside of the country) and the current political power structure.

Carnival does directly represent the 35 countries of the Caribbean that has spawned this amazing festival, yet Carnival has cultural elements from all over the globe and deriving from the continent of Africa, it is an event that finds a way to bring unity with diversity.

Carnival is an explosion of music, food, costumes and various aspects of culture, the best that the melting pot of the Caribbean offers. It engages family of all ages and communities and people from all walks of life. The patrons will be exposed to costume bands, music bands, steel pan bands, the diverse food along with a worldwide connection and sense of excitement and bliss.

The Carnival could not come at a better time. We all need a moment of community that is filled with joy and peace. A day where all cares are thrown to the wind and we lose ourselves in our best selves. On this day we will partake of the euphoria that has been handed down from generation to generation and has sparked creativity, connectivity and ecstasy.

The Miami Broward One Carnival will have all the activities spoken of and culminate with a concert of some of Soca’s best artists. The concert is headlined by Kes the Band, Patrice Roberts and Ricardo Drue. Here is a small Q&A we had with Ricardo Drue to give us more of an opportunity to learn more about him.

 

Questions for Ricardo Drue

JW: For those that don’t know who Ricardo Drue is, describe yourself.

RD: Ricardo Drue is a son the Caribbean, born in Antigua Raised in Trinidad and currently living in Florida. I think I’m probably one of the most goofy and weird artiste you’ll ever meet. I enjoy entertaining people and I am forever grateful for every opportunity that I get to perform for the masses. Every chance I get to perform is a chance to help someone get away from whatever bad they may be going through.

JW: If you could write your own headline, what would it be?

RD: Ricardo Drue A man who changed the World with Music/Soca

JW: You have been in the music game for a very long time. What are your tips on staying relevant?

RD: Staying as connected to the industry as much as you can, which includes educating yourself on the ins and outs of the game. This industry changes very fast, and if you not attentive enough you can get lost very quickly

JW: What are you grateful for in your life?

RD: Life itself, just the fact I’m able to wake every day is a blessing. I am also grateful for my Family, i am nothing without them.

JW: When did you know you wanted to take music seriously?

RD: At the age of 5, I knew I was going to do something with music, I wasn’t sure what it was but I knew it was music.

JW: What is one of your favorite projects you have worked on or songs you have done?

RD: Favorite project to date with have to be iD “(stamp you name)”. With this song i learned how to bring true emotion out of my audience.

JW: What kind of stuff did you grow up listening to?

RD: R&B, Pop, Calypso and Country (lol I know).

JW: Who are some of your music heroes?

RD: BoyzII Men, Bob Marley, Bunji Garlin, Ronnie Macintosh, Micheal Jackson & Neyo

JW: In your musical journey so far, what are some of the biggest lessons you’ve learned?

RD: Always be humble, you never know when you are going to be down, The same people you treat badly on your way up, is the same people you will meet on your way down!

JW: What is next for you?

RD: We have expanded the iDnation, and now in addition to music we are also doing events around the world, For example we have “Druesday” in Antigua, and we also have Adventure Island ( wed oct 3rd 2018) for Miami Carnival and so much more.

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Respect to Africans throughout the Caribbean and the rest of the world who fought against the holocaust of slavery. The fight led to the end of the evil system. Unfortunately the affects are still seen today and have evolved in different ways.

Jamaica vs USA in the Gold Cup Final 2017

 

United States vs. Jamaica
2017 Gold Cup Final
Levi’s Stadium – Santa Clara, Calif.
Wednesday, July 26 – 9:30 p.m. ET
WATCH: FS1, Univision, UDN (USA) | TSN 1/3/4/5 (CAN)

 

This was the final that was not expected by any of the media pundits. They did not expect Jamaica to be in the final. That is understandable though, Jamaica’s Reggae Boyz came into the final with none of their established leaders or stars and had a starting team that mainly had either been on the bench that last Gold Cup run or had not even been on the team. Whereas Mexico and USA who have been the longstanding giants of Concacaf were expected to be the finalist. The two giant countries; more resourced, experienced and with decorated players had been the script and narrative to be the finalists.

Jamaica has shocked the football world by making it to the finals, again. We will see who comes out as the victor tonight!

 

 

2016 Rio Olympics - Athletics - Final - Women's 100m Final - Olympic Stadium - Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - 13/08/2016. Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce (JAM) of Jamaica celebrates after winning the bronze medal after the 100m womens final. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS.

2016 Rio Olympics – Athletics – Final – Women’s 100m Final – Olympic Stadium – Rio de Janeiro, Brazil – 13/08/2016. Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce (JAM) of Jamaica celebrates after winning the bronze medal after the 100m womens final.

              She is called the Pocket Rocket, the Jamaican athlete who hails from Wolmer’s Girls High school burst on the scene in 2008 when she won her 1st Olympic gold medal which would be the beginning of a career that included 4 World Championships and 2 Gold medals  (making her the undisputed 100m track queen of her generation). All of this success for a woman sprinter was already historic. Throughout this period her contagiously wonderful smile, humble spirit and constant positive Christian references made her a fan favourite.

            Coming into the Rio Olympics  there was a lot of hype to the fact that she could do what no woman in history has ever done and that is win the Olympic gold a 3rd time. Fraser-Pryce had made the Jamaica Olympic team, however she was injured, she had suffered a toe injury earlier in the year and many thought she would not have made it to Rio. She even won her heats and the semi-final, however when she completed the Semi-final she was clearly in pain, so much show she bent over crying. She had to be helped off the track. The pressure was on.

              Then came the final. Shelly burst out of the blocks, a bit slower than her norm, ten seconds later she crossed the line 3rd with her teammate Elaine Thompson from Jamaica coming in 1st. Fraser-Pryce ran through the pain to achieve the medal. Although clearly disappointing Fraser-Pryce showed amazing grace by immediately hugging the winner in what seemed an  extremely sincere embrace and celebrating with her. She even stated later that this was her favourite medal for all that she had to battle to achieve this.

               By coming 3rd Fraser-Pryce has exhibited the best of the human spirit in such a situation. She already was a legend for all she had done, now she has taken everything to another level. Thank you Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce. Here is more of what she said after the race.

“Jamaica is officially on the medal count! The ceremony for the 100m final will be at approximately 7:15pm……
When God remains faithful and gave you more than you could ask for. We don’t get To pick our battles and that’s ok. But you get to give it everything you have. My greatest accomplishment Is showing up at that line and feeling thankful for the opportunity. I witness Elaine taking her moment and I’m happy because she deserves it, A time and season for everyone so take your bow. It will be a pleasure to stand on the podium with you. To my family both in blood and in Christ, Your prayers were my strength and your belief carried me the extra mile. I could not quit because it’s not in me. In the good and the ugly, I will always show up. To my sponsors, thank you for standing with me. My friends and my fans, you never stopped believing so why should I. Sometimes when we believe we have something to lose we actually have everything to gain. It was a ‪#‎PrycelessJourney‬!”

  • Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce

Answer the question below

SkyWalker Buzz and 2BKaribbean would like to give you an opportunity to win a pair of tickets to see two of the most talented artist musicians in Reggae music Tarrus Riley and the Legend Dean Fraser, in Atlanta Thursday night at Center Stage, 1375 West Peachtree St Atlanta Ga

 

To win you need to answer this question, by midnite Wednesday the 20th

“What instrument did Dean Fraser start playing at the age of 12” 

The 1st person with the right answer will be asked to send contact info and will get the pair of tickets to you. Enjoy!

marcus_garvey_0822

TODAY IS MARCUS GARVEY’S BIRTHDAY, in the face of all that has been occurring (police brutality against brown and black people, institutional racism and all other forms of oppression) the words of MARCUS MOSIAH GARVEY can help us in our quest for change.

 

“One God One Aim One Destiny”

 

Short Overview from Jamaica Information Service.

 

– Jamaica’s first National Hero was born in St. Ann’s Bay, St. Ann, on August 17, 1887. In his youth Garvey migrated to Kingston, where he worked as a printer and later published a small paper “The Watchman”.

 

During his career Garvey travelled extensively throughout many countries, observing the poor working and living conditions of black people.

 

In 1914 he started the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA), in Jamaica. The UNIA, which grew into an international organisation, encouraged self-government for black people worldwide; self-help economic projects and protest against racial discrimination.

 

In 1916, Garvey went to the USA where he preached his doctrine of freedom to the oppressed blacks throughout the country.

 

However, USA officials disapproved of his activities and he was imprisoned, then deported.

 

Back in Jamaica in 1927, he continued his political activity, forming the People’s Political Party in 1929. He was unsuccessful in national elections but won a seat on the Kingston and St. Andrew Corporation (KSAC).

 

But the world of the 1930s was not ready for Garvey’s progressive ideas. He left Jamaica again, this time for England where he died in 1940. His body was brought back to Jamaica in 1964 and buried in the National Heroes Park in Kingston.

 

Garvey’s legacy can be summed up in the philosophy he taught – race pride, the need for African unity; self-reliance; the need for black people to be organised and for rulers to govern on behalf of the working classes.