Archive for the ‘Africa’ Category

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Respect to Africans throughout the Caribbean and the rest of the world who fought against the holocaust of slavery. The fight led to the end of the evil system. Unfortunately the affects are still seen today and have evolved in different ways.

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Jamaica vs USA in the Gold Cup Final 2017

 

United States vs. Jamaica
2017 Gold Cup Final
Levi’s Stadium – Santa Clara, Calif.
Wednesday, July 26 – 9:30 p.m. ET
WATCH: FS1, Univision, UDN (USA) | TSN 1/3/4/5 (CAN)

 

This was the final that was not expected by any of the media pundits. They did not expect Jamaica to be in the final. That is understandable though, Jamaica’s Reggae Boyz came into the final with none of their established leaders or stars and had a starting team that mainly had either been on the bench that last Gold Cup run or had not even been on the team. Whereas Mexico and USA who have been the longstanding giants of Concacaf were expected to be the finalist. The two giant countries; more resourced, experienced and with decorated players had been the script and narrative to be the finalists.

Jamaica has shocked the football world by making it to the finals, again. We will see who comes out as the victor tonight!

 

 

2016 Rio Olympics - Athletics - Final - Women's 100m Final - Olympic Stadium - Rio de Janeiro, Brazil - 13/08/2016. Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce (JAM) of Jamaica celebrates after winning the bronze medal after the 100m womens final. REUTERS/Kai Pfaffenbach FOR EDITORIAL USE ONLY. NOT FOR SALE FOR MARKETING OR ADVERTISING CAMPAIGNS.

2016 Rio Olympics – Athletics – Final – Women’s 100m Final – Olympic Stadium – Rio de Janeiro, Brazil – 13/08/2016. Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce (JAM) of Jamaica celebrates after winning the bronze medal after the 100m womens final.

              She is called the Pocket Rocket, the Jamaican athlete who hails from Wolmer’s Girls High school burst on the scene in 2008 when she won her 1st Olympic gold medal which would be the beginning of a career that included 4 World Championships and 2 Gold medals  (making her the undisputed 100m track queen of her generation). All of this success for a woman sprinter was already historic. Throughout this period her contagiously wonderful smile, humble spirit and constant positive Christian references made her a fan favourite.

            Coming into the Rio Olympics  there was a lot of hype to the fact that she could do what no woman in history has ever done and that is win the Olympic gold a 3rd time. Fraser-Pryce had made the Jamaica Olympic team, however she was injured, she had suffered a toe injury earlier in the year and many thought she would not have made it to Rio. She even won her heats and the semi-final, however when she completed the Semi-final she was clearly in pain, so much show she bent over crying. She had to be helped off the track. The pressure was on.

              Then came the final. Shelly burst out of the blocks, a bit slower than her norm, ten seconds later she crossed the line 3rd with her teammate Elaine Thompson from Jamaica coming in 1st. Fraser-Pryce ran through the pain to achieve the medal. Although clearly disappointing Fraser-Pryce showed amazing grace by immediately hugging the winner in what seemed an  extremely sincere embrace and celebrating with her. She even stated later that this was her favourite medal for all that she had to battle to achieve this.

               By coming 3rd Fraser-Pryce has exhibited the best of the human spirit in such a situation. She already was a legend for all she had done, now she has taken everything to another level. Thank you Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce. Here is more of what she said after the race.

“Jamaica is officially on the medal count! The ceremony for the 100m final will be at approximately 7:15pm……
When God remains faithful and gave you more than you could ask for. We don’t get To pick our battles and that’s ok. But you get to give it everything you have. My greatest accomplishment Is showing up at that line and feeling thankful for the opportunity. I witness Elaine taking her moment and I’m happy because she deserves it, A time and season for everyone so take your bow. It will be a pleasure to stand on the podium with you. To my family both in blood and in Christ, Your prayers were my strength and your belief carried me the extra mile. I could not quit because it’s not in me. In the good and the ugly, I will always show up. To my sponsors, thank you for standing with me. My friends and my fans, you never stopped believing so why should I. Sometimes when we believe we have something to lose we actually have everything to gain. It was a ‪#‎PrycelessJourney‬!”

  • Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce

Answer the question below

SkyWalker Buzz and 2BKaribbean would like to give you an opportunity to win a pair of tickets to see two of the most talented artist musicians in Reggae music Tarrus Riley and the Legend Dean Fraser, in Atlanta Thursday night at Center Stage, 1375 West Peachtree St Atlanta Ga

 

To win you need to answer this question, by midnite Wednesday the 20th

“What instrument did Dean Fraser start playing at the age of 12” 

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marcus_garvey_0822

TODAY IS MARCUS GARVEY’S BIRTHDAY, in the face of all that has been occurring (police brutality against brown and black people, institutional racism and all other forms of oppression) the words of MARCUS MOSIAH GARVEY can help us in our quest for change.

 

“One God One Aim One Destiny”

 

Short Overview from Jamaica Information Service.

 

– Jamaica’s first National Hero was born in St. Ann’s Bay, St. Ann, on August 17, 1887. In his youth Garvey migrated to Kingston, where he worked as a printer and later published a small paper “The Watchman”.

 

During his career Garvey travelled extensively throughout many countries, observing the poor working and living conditions of black people.

 

In 1914 he started the Universal Negro Improvement Association (UNIA), in Jamaica. The UNIA, which grew into an international organisation, encouraged self-government for black people worldwide; self-help economic projects and protest against racial discrimination.

 

In 1916, Garvey went to the USA where he preached his doctrine of freedom to the oppressed blacks throughout the country.

 

However, USA officials disapproved of his activities and he was imprisoned, then deported.

 

Back in Jamaica in 1927, he continued his political activity, forming the People’s Political Party in 1929. He was unsuccessful in national elections but won a seat on the Kingston and St. Andrew Corporation (KSAC).

 

But the world of the 1930s was not ready for Garvey’s progressive ideas. He left Jamaica again, this time for England where he died in 1940. His body was brought back to Jamaica in 1964 and buried in the National Heroes Park in Kingston.

 

Garvey’s legacy can be summed up in the philosophy he taught – race pride, the need for African unity; self-reliance; the need for black people to be organised and for rulers to govern on behalf of the working classes.

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Third World Maxi Priest

QUESTION: “THIRD WORLD HAS HAD A FEW LEAD SINGERS OVER THE YEARS. ONE HAD A NICKNAME THAT IS A VEGETABLE, WHAT IS HIS FULL NAME AND NICKNAME?”

SUNDAY, AUGUST 17, 2014
NBAF Global presents
THIRD WORLD  ||  MAXI PRIEST 
and JULIE DEXTER 
@
THE TABERNACLE
152 Luckie Street ~ Atlanta, GA
6pm
Tickets start @ $15, VIP tickets available
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Emancipation Park statues representing Africans looking to the sky after Emancipation declared throughout the British Empire in 1834

Emancipation Park statues representing Africans looking to the sky after Emancipation declared throughout the British Empire in 1834

(I originally wrote this piece a few years ago, still seems to make sense to me)

By Jason Walker

Emancipation day is an important day for the descendants of Africa, especially those whose ancestors were impacted by the brutal Slave trade. In the 1800’s the holocaust of slavery was hit with a crippling blow around the world. The Emancipation Act was passed on July 31, 1834 throughout the British Empire and effectively ended the inhumane Slave Trade. Full freedom from slavery did not come until four years later on August 1, 1838.  The 4 year period was instituted as a transition period as this monumental change would irrevocably change societies worldwide. The abolition of Slavery in the British Empire would affect slavery everywhere mainly because Britain’s navy owned the seas and without the cooperation of the British Navy, it made slavery both difficult and expensive. And as destructive, dehumanizing and inhumane the European version of the system of slavery was; it was for all intents and purposes an economic manifestation.

Slavery was a cruel and destructive system that had Africans as free labourers in labour intensive industries such as Cotton, Sugar and Tobacco. Throughout the 1400’s through to the middle of the 1700’s products such as these fetched a very attractive price, along with the free labour, a tidy profit could be made. Although labour was free, the cost to keep Africans enslaved was high. Especially in areas where there were slaves freeing themselves and staging revolts. The most successful of these of course included the Maroons in Jamaica from the 1500’s through to the 1700’s and even more so the Africans (including Maroons) in Haiti who at the end of the 1700’s would successfully wage a revolution against French armies, supported by Spain and England.

Do not think though that the Emancipation act came about from any suddenly altruistic gestures by the British Monarchy. Due to the work of many abolitionists in Britain; the sentiment against the horrific system Slavery had grown tremendously among the English population. Also the prices of the aforementioned products began to drop on the world markets as new products that did not need this labour intensive situation were now rising to prominence. Along with that came the advent of the industrial age which was ushering a new era where such labour numbers were not the order of the day. All the aforementioned along with the cost of keeping control and responding to revolts made these endeavours non-attractive. Continuing the genocidal and devastating system Slavery no longer made economic sense.

As we come to the present, we find that it is only in the past two decades that countries have decided to mark this date as a holiday, and of the countries that were affected by this act (Countries in Africa, The Caribbean, Central America, South America, & North America) a small percentage actually commemorate this day*. Maybe that is appropriate; I say this because although things are different from the era of slavery, people of African descent in the aforementioned geographical areas are not in a position of true emancipation.

The definition of Emancipation from the English Oxford Dictionary states that it is “the fact or process of being set free from legal, social, or political restrictions; liberation:” With the majority of African persons in these areas lacking resources, political clout, and in some cases freedom, can we really call ourselves emancipated? It was probably this same observation that led former Prime Minister of Jamaica and former leader of the Non-Aligned Movement (a coalition of countries that were not listed as industrial nations) Michael Manley to say; “The enslavement of the body which endured till 1838 was nothing compared to the enslavement of the mind which persisted since”. The affects of slavery and the propaganda to support slavery has endured and left a lasting mark and has conspired to keep those of African descent in such a position.

Yet by our accomplishments singularly and in some rare cases collectively we see we are a very powerful people. So it is possible to change the current existence. However we will probably have to do what Reggae Superstar Bob Marley said in his song Redemption Song: “Emancipate Yourself From Mental Slavery” before we can truly be at a stage of Emancipation. So although we celebrate the Act that saw fruition on August 1 1838 annually, we should probably use these days to see where we are on the road of getting to the next stage of Emancipation and be creative in getting to that new stage.

*Countries that Celebrate Emancipation Day include: Jamaica, Barbados, Bermuda, Bahamas, St. Lucia, Canada, Guyana, St. Vincent & the Grenadines, Grenada, Trinidad & Tobago, Turks & Caicos, Anguilla, British Virgin Islands, Dominica, St. Kitts & Nevis