Archive for the ‘Reggae’ Category

Jack Radics Tour dates

SOUND FACULTY PRESENTS THE JACK RADICS WATERSHED TOUR FEATURING:

 

JACK RADICS LIVE! with special guest Erica Newell & the BLACKDIAMOND Band

Here are the cities:

Friday the 20th of January – Da Real Ting Cafe” Jacksonville Florida. Showtime @ 1:00 AM

Saturday, the 21st of January – Ginger Bay Cafe Hollywood Fl Showtime @ 9:00 pm

jack-radics-live

Sunday, the 22nd of January – “Reggae Sunday’s at the Wynwood Yard Miami Fl showtime at 8:00pm

reggae-sundays-at-the-yard

Monday, the 23rd of January 2017 – “Bostons on the Beach” Delray Beach, Fl Showtime 8:00pm

Thursday the 9th of February – Club Euphoria Richmond Va 23225 Showtime 9:00pm

Friday the 10th of February – Milk River Restaurant Brooklyn NY Showtime 9:00pm

Saturday the 11th of February – Off the Tikki Patchogue, NY Showtime 11:00 pm

 

Sunday, the 12th of February – “The Shrine Music World” New York, NY Showtime 9:00pm

 

Thursday the 16th of February – The “Island Club” Athens GA Showtime 9:00pm

FOR MORE INFORMATION GO TOWWW.JACKRADICSONLINE.COM

WIN TICKETS TO THE MANY RIVERS TO CROSS CONCERT: BY ANSWERING THIS QUESTION: NAME HARRY BELAFONTE’S 1ST INTERNATIONAL HIT AND WHO WAS THE SONG ABOUT? THE FIRST TO ANSWER BELOW WILL GET INSTRUCTIONS ON HOW TO GET THEIR TICKETS.

MANY RIVERS TO CROSS

HARRY BELAFONTE PRESENTS 

“MANY RIVERS TO CROSS” 

A FESTIVAL OF MUSIC ART & JUSTICE ON THE 1ST AND THE 2ND OF OCT 2016

WITH JACK RADICKS, JAMIE FOXX, JOHN LEGEND, ESTELLE, PUBLIC ENEMY, T.I., CARLOS SANTANA, CHRIS ROCK, COMMON, CORNEL WEST, JESSE WILLIAMS, & MANY MORE

MANY RIVERS TO CROSS: A FESTIVAL OF MUSIC ART & JUSTICE WILL OCCUR AT THE CHATTAHOOCHEE HILLS ATLANTA GA.

Answer the question below

SkyWalker Buzz and 2BKaribbean would like to give you an opportunity to win a pair of tickets to see two of the most talented artist musicians in Reggae music Tarrus Riley and the Legend Dean Fraser, in Atlanta Thursday night at Center Stage, 1375 West Peachtree St Atlanta Ga

 

To win you need to answer this question, by midnite Wednesday the 20th

“What instrument did Dean Fraser start playing at the age of 12” 

The 1st person with the right answer will be asked to send contact info and will get the pair of tickets to you. Enjoy!

 

JAMAICA FLAG

HAPPY BIRTHDAY JAMAICA LAND OF MY BIRTH
 
BY Jason Walker
 
Today JAMAICA is 53. It is a moment of blessing and happiness for those of us born in, descendant of and love Jamaica. It is also a time to share that happiness with those who love Jamaica although not born in the land of wood and water. There are many reasons to be proud of our young small nation and the peoples who have been brought forth from this nation that have put a stamp on human history. All this has been done while facing seemingly insurmountable odds from the first moment Europeans destroyed the aboriginal people in Jamaica, to the Africans fighting against slavery and having limited success against the most far-reaching holocaust in human history, to the influencing of PAn African thought through Marcus Garvey & Rastafarians and the infectuous Reggae music and powerful contirbutions in the areas of human rights, progressive thought, academia, Christian service, athletics and so much more.
 
We have done all this while dealing with challenges from both outside and inside of our communities and creating a Diaspora that by all estimates doubles our population on the island. I would like to see as a present on this 53rd year, all Jamaicans really coming together with a mindset of always supporting people and things Jamaican in positive realms and to use all these areas of GODly anointing that we show so successfully to truly make us advance in every area so that we not only benefit ourselves, but the whole human race.
 
Happy Birthday Jamaica to all Jamaicans, those of Jamaican descent and those who love Jamaica
 
National Pledge
 
Before God and all mankind, 
I pledge the love and loyalty of my heart, 
the wisdom and courage of my mind, 
the strength and vigour of my body in the service of my fellow citizens; 
I promise to stand up for Justice, Brotherhood and Peace, 
to work diligently and creatively, 
to think generously and honestly, 
so that Jamaica may, under God, 
increase in beauty, fellowship and prosperity, 
and play her part in advancing the welfare of the whole human race.

 

WIN TICKETS TO THIRD WORLD & MAXI PRIEST

BE THE 1ST ANSWER THE QUESTION BELOW THE FLYER BY 5:00PM TODAY EST 16/AUG/2014 CORRECTLY

POST ANSWER IN COMMENTS BELOW, THEN EMAIL ME YOUR PHONE NUMBER AND REAL NAME TO jasonpromotions@gmail.com and I will arrange for you to get you tickets

 

Third World Maxi Priest

QUESTION: “THIRD WORLD HAS HAD A FEW LEAD SINGERS OVER THE YEARS. ONE HAD A NICKNAME THAT IS A VEGETABLE, WHAT IS HIS FULL NAME AND NICKNAME?”

SUNDAY, AUGUST 17, 2014
NBAF Global presents
THIRD WORLD  ||  MAXI PRIEST 
and JULIE DEXTER 
@
THE TABERNACLE
152 Luckie Street ~ Atlanta, GA
6pm
Tickets start @ $15, VIP tickets available
Purchase tickets online @ 

 

CLASH IN ATLANTA

CLASH IN ATLANTA

BY JASON WALKER

MIKE DOBSON PRESENTS
Shebada bringing his Jamaican Play to Atlanta August 16
to the Georgia Tech Ferst Center Theater
 
Atlanta has always been a destination for Jamaican plays, ever since the Caribbean population in Atlanta started to grow in leaps and bounds since the 1980’s. With a population of roughly 200,000 persons. And of that 200,000 a big chunk is Jamaican, so it makes sense that another Jamaican play should be brought to Atlanta. 
 
This play is “Clash” starring Keith “Shebada’ Ramsay, simply know as Shebada. Shebada is one of the hottest commodities in Jamaican and Caribbean comedy and theatre. Shebada draws thousands of people to his plays, does TV and has become very popular in Jamaica’s music world. Not since Oliver Samuels has there been such a cult following. Shebada has become extremely popular throughout the Caribbean and the Caribbean Diaspora (Canada, US and UK). 
 
Critics in Jamaica say that Shebada’s performance in Clash is his best since Bashment Granny. Shebada plays Rivers a road manager of an up and coming Jamaican artist. The play is an irreverent look at Jamaica’s music industry filled with area leaders doubling as unscroupulous promoters, incompetent road managers,  shady booking agents, and dancehall artistes who are not very bright.
 
Shebada represents the new generation of Jamaican theatre which showcases the modern Jamaican culture, his rapid fire manner that he executes his comedy has enthralled and delighted audiences and has given new Jamaica a platform. Shebada is also known to touch on very risque topics for Jamaican society. His most famous character “Bashment Geanny” which sees Shebada in drag on Jamaican stages is not a normal phenomenon seen in that country’s theatre industry.
 
Although very popular, he is a very private person and does not like crowds. Shebada grew up in a large family and in economically challenging circumstances in Franklin Town, Jamaica and has gone on to become a Jamaican superstar. The play Clash also stars Jamaican theatre legendary Volier “Maffie” Johnson. along with Garfield “Bad Boy Trevor” Reid, Tuana Flowers and more. Atlanta audiences are going to be treated to one of the most talented and brilliant talents to grace the Atlanta stage on August 16th at the Goergia Tech Fest Center Theater / doors open at 6pm / 349 ferst drive Atlanta Ga for more information the number is 7703679677
Emancipation Park statues representing Africans looking to the sky after Emancipation declared throughout the British Empire in 1834

Emancipation Park statues representing Africans looking to the sky after Emancipation declared throughout the British Empire in 1834

(I originally wrote this piece a few years ago, still seems to make sense to me)

By Jason Walker

Emancipation day is an important day for the descendants of Africa, especially those whose ancestors were impacted by the brutal Slave trade. In the 1800’s the holocaust of slavery was hit with a crippling blow around the world. The Emancipation Act was passed on July 31, 1834 throughout the British Empire and effectively ended the inhumane Slave Trade. Full freedom from slavery did not come until four years later on August 1, 1838.  The 4 year period was instituted as a transition period as this monumental change would irrevocably change societies worldwide. The abolition of Slavery in the British Empire would affect slavery everywhere mainly because Britain’s navy owned the seas and without the cooperation of the British Navy, it made slavery both difficult and expensive. And as destructive, dehumanizing and inhumane the European version of the system of slavery was; it was for all intents and purposes an economic manifestation.

Slavery was a cruel and destructive system that had Africans as free labourers in labour intensive industries such as Cotton, Sugar and Tobacco. Throughout the 1400’s through to the middle of the 1700’s products such as these fetched a very attractive price, along with the free labour, a tidy profit could be made. Although labour was free, the cost to keep Africans enslaved was high. Especially in areas where there were slaves freeing themselves and staging revolts. The most successful of these of course included the Maroons in Jamaica from the 1500’s through to the 1700’s and even more so the Africans (including Maroons) in Haiti who at the end of the 1700’s would successfully wage a revolution against French armies, supported by Spain and England.

Do not think though that the Emancipation act came about from any suddenly altruistic gestures by the British Monarchy. Due to the work of many abolitionists in Britain; the sentiment against the horrific system Slavery had grown tremendously among the English population. Also the prices of the aforementioned products began to drop on the world markets as new products that did not need this labour intensive situation were now rising to prominence. Along with that came the advent of the industrial age which was ushering a new era where such labour numbers were not the order of the day. All the aforementioned along with the cost of keeping control and responding to revolts made these endeavours non-attractive. Continuing the genocidal and devastating system Slavery no longer made economic sense.

As we come to the present, we find that it is only in the past two decades that countries have decided to mark this date as a holiday, and of the countries that were affected by this act (Countries in Africa, The Caribbean, Central America, South America, & North America) a small percentage actually commemorate this day*. Maybe that is appropriate; I say this because although things are different from the era of slavery, people of African descent in the aforementioned geographical areas are not in a position of true emancipation.

The definition of Emancipation from the English Oxford Dictionary states that it is “the fact or process of being set free from legal, social, or political restrictions; liberation:” With the majority of African persons in these areas lacking resources, political clout, and in some cases freedom, can we really call ourselves emancipated? It was probably this same observation that led former Prime Minister of Jamaica and former leader of the Non-Aligned Movement (a coalition of countries that were not listed as industrial nations) Michael Manley to say; “The enslavement of the body which endured till 1838 was nothing compared to the enslavement of the mind which persisted since”. The affects of slavery and the propaganda to support slavery has endured and left a lasting mark and has conspired to keep those of African descent in such a position.

Yet by our accomplishments singularly and in some rare cases collectively we see we are a very powerful people. So it is possible to change the current existence. However we will probably have to do what Reggae Superstar Bob Marley said in his song Redemption Song: “Emancipate Yourself From Mental Slavery” before we can truly be at a stage of Emancipation. So although we celebrate the Act that saw fruition on August 1 1838 annually, we should probably use these days to see where we are on the road of getting to the next stage of Emancipation and be creative in getting to that new stage.

*Countries that Celebrate Emancipation Day include: Jamaica, Barbados, Bermuda, Bahamas, St. Lucia, Canada, Guyana, St. Vincent & the Grenadines, Grenada, Trinidad & Tobago, Turks & Caicos, Anguilla, British Virgin Islands, Dominica, St. Kitts & Nevis