Posts Tagged ‘History’

Kamala Harris becomes the 1st Black, Female, Jamaican🇯🇲 American, Indian American Vice President of the United States #history as Joe Biden becomes the 46th President of the US Congratulations!

The Jamaica national ice hockey team created History yesterday. The Island of Jamaica from the warm, tropical Caribbean won an international ice hockey tournament, yes I said it (or typed it) , the Jamaican Ice Boyz are the champions of an Ice Hockey competition staged in the US. This team of Jamaican born and Jamaican descent players made the country proud.

Jamaican defeated Colombia in a nail biter of a game. The nail biter aspect of this was surprising since Jamaica had defeated Colombia earlier in the competition and had lost 5-0. Maybe the Colombian team had taken Jamaica lightly the first time out, maybe Colombia had adjusted brilliantly to the Jamaican team, or maybe the Jamaican team had finally gotten a little tired and banged up after a dominant run that led up to the final (5-0 against Colombia, 8-4 over Argentina, 7-0 over Brazil & 6-0 Over Mexico), a final that was in the 1st ever Ice Hockey competition that Jamaica has entered,

In the tight game Jamaica went up 2-0 early. The Jamaicans in the building were loud and in joyous spirits, grooving to hits from Sean Paul & Damian & Stephen Marley. However unlike the previous encounter Colombia was right there with the Boyz from the island of wood & water. The Colombians matched the Jamaicans in speed, which up to this point had not been done by any team, including the Colombians.

Although the Colombians were matching us in tactics, speed and execution, the 2-0 lead gave comfort, to what was both the largest crowd for the whole tournament and the largest number of Jamaicans and Jamaican supporters who came out during the competition.

Then, Jamaica had a major setback, one of their best players Carton Thorton had gotten hurt, had to be taken off and did not return. Players who had been injured earlier in the tournament now had to step up. Strong players like Jaden Lindo now had to dig deep.

Colombia’s best player Daniel Echeverri played the entire 48 minutes, their goalie became almost impassable after the 2 goals scored. Then it happened in the 3rd period, Colombia scored. The Colombia fans went wild. They scored again! 2-2.

That score would hold all the way until regulation time ended, albeit with many close calls for both sides. This set up the penalties, and after a tense period, Jamaica’s goalie saved enough and offense scored enough for Jamaica to win 3-2. History had been made.

The crowd went wild, the team went wild, everybody jumped on the ice. Coaches CJ Bollers & Darwin Murray (whose brilliant coaching led the way) beamed with pride. Then the national anthem played and everyone who was there from and for Jamaica stood at attention. The Ice Boyz showed unadulterated joy, along with classy humility to all, throughout the whole weekend they showed respect to teams, fans and organizers.

Jamaica’s Counsel General, Oliver Mair celebrated along with team and fans and said ” We are sooo proud of our Jamaican Hockey team and congratulate them on this historic victory! We are a people capable of doing anything we put our minds towards accomplishing.” AKA we little but we tallawah.”

This is a strong statement for Jamaica to be a viable participant of the Ice Hockey world. If Jamaica can raise the millions necessary to have an ice rink in Jamaica they could be eligible to compete in the Winter Olympics (Ice Runnings anyone?).

On the 8th of September Jamaica created history by hoisting the LATAM 2019 trophy in Ice Hockey at the Florida Panthers Ice Den in South Florida.

– Jason Walker

Bahamas Needs Our Help

COCONUT CREEK, Fla. (September 2, 2019) Food For The Poor is responding to an urgent need for aid to our neighbor the Bahamas, which has been devastated by Hurricane Dorian. The charity will respond with partners Sandals Foundation and the Episcopal Diocese of Southeast Florida to identify greatest need and coordinate distribution of aid. 

Containers of essential items will be loaded and sent immediately, but the charity needs help with a request for canned goods and diapers. Food For The Poor is asking for donations of canned meats, canned fish and canned milk, both evaporated and condensed, and disposable diapers. Perishable items cannot be accepted. 

“We are saddened by the images of devastation and heartbroken to hear news reports that at least one child’s life has been lost to this horrific storm,” said Food For The Poor President/CEO Robin Mahfood, in expressing the urgency of the situation. “If it were us, we would want to know that caring people would come to our aid. They have nothing left. We must respond and we must do so immediately.”

(Update: Death toll has risen to 20, as of Sept. 5).

Food For The Poor announced last Friday that it was poised to aid areas of Florida most affected by the impact of Hurricane Dorian, and is monitoring that situation as well. Since Florida wasn’t affected, that aid will go to the Bahamas.

Canned meats, canned fish, canned milk, and diapers can be brought to the charity’s warehouse at 6401 Lyons Road, Coconut Creek, Fl, 33073, starting Wednesday, Sept. 4. Any other items cannot be accepted. Drop-off hours are weekdays between 10 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. (Items should be taken directly to the warehouse, following the driveway around the right side of Food For The Poor.)

The Sandals Foundation is a nonprofit organization aimed at fulfilling the promise of the Caribbean community by improving lives and preserving its natural surroundings through investments in sustainable regional projects and programs in education, community and the environment.

The Episcopal Diocese of Southeast Florida has 76 congregations as diverse as Southeast Florida itself running from Key West north to Jensen Beach and west to Clewiston. The Episcopal Church in Southeast Florida includes approximately 38,000 members including congregations that worship regularly in Spanish and French/Creole.

Please go to FoodForThePoor.org/bahamas to make a donation.

Buju Banton, arguably Dancehall’s greatest artist, a Grammy award winner, creator of the greatest Dancehall album ever (Til’ Shiloh), an international reggae Icon and much more to Jamaica, the Caribbean, the Reggae and music world, has returned home after 8 years incarcerated in the United States.

The artist who was welcomed by friends and family, joy and love, immediately focused on his loved ones who he has been separated from for so long. Jamaicans in Jamaica and abroad and Reggae lovers around the world celebrated the 7th of December 2018 like never before.

Photo caption: Buju reunited with his daughter.

Already it seems though that Buju AKA Mark Myrie will be working with his original manager, Donovan Germaine. also already celebrating managing Dalton Harris to the historic win in the X-Factor UK. They will definitely be working on some quality music that we all need to be exposed to.

Below is Buju’s father speaking about his son’s return.

Below is a statement from Buju’s team.

 

Dalton Harris has created history. Dalton Harris has won the X Factor UK becoming the 1st ever Jamaican and Caribbean artist to achieve this feat. Harris dominated throughout the competition, with effortless skill, amazing talent and humility.

Dalton Harris’ unique voice belted out amazing performances of hard to sing songs, in what seemed to be, easily week after week and topped the competition each time. The judges were in total disbelief that such a talent had not already been a worldwide star.

In Harris’ home country, Jamaica, Harris had already broken a record by being the youngest person to win Jamaica’s music competition, Rising Stars. Harris won the competition at the age of 16. Unfortunately, he did not see much success after that great victory. Harris had lived a life of poverty and alleged child abuse up to this point, he had been left to fend on his own at the age of 15.

Legendary producer Donovan Germaine (who managed or produced such legends as Beres Hammond, Marcia Griffiths, & Buju Banton) took Harris under his wing, helped him to finish high school and mentored Harris into becoming a better vocalist. Germaine had produced several songs with Harris, yet the sales of such music were not strong.

At age 24, Dalton Harris was auditioning on the X-Factor, and the rest is history. Harris had some of his family, friends and his mentor Germaine in attendance at the final. As his humility showed throughout once his name was called as the winner, he was clearly still in a state of disbelief.

Pandimion was created at the event, in Jamaica, and around the world! Social Media lit up. Celebrities from all over were congratulating Dalton.

Jamaican superstar singer and Princess of Reggae, Nadine Sutherland (who had also been one of the judges on Jamaica’s Rising Star when Dalton won that competition) stated, “to be a small part of Dalton’s journey is indeed an honor. From his entrance and then subsequent winning of the Rising Stars talent competition, where I was a panelist judge alongside Clyde Mackenzie and Anthony Miller, it was obvious that he was very gifted. To see this gift blossom and develop into him winning the international talent contest XFactor 2018 is incredible. His journey so far is an inspirational story of challenges and victories and is befitting to be on the big screen. My joy for him is indescribable.”

The Royal family was also represented by the Duchess of York, Sarah Ferguson who gushed, “Congratulations @harrisdalton you are a true superstar. I knew you could do it. You were superb this weekend and I am so proud of you!”

Jamaica’s Prime Minister Andrew Holness shared, “Congratulations to our Dalton Harris @harrisdalton! Winner of the XFactor. The entire Jamaica is proud of you. Your phenomenal talent is now unleashed on the world.”

Yes, Dalton, we are all proud of you!

 

 

 

In the Final Saturday, after two performances, Dalton Harris, the amazing and inspirational story of an artist coming out of nowhere and impressing the world, takes another step to winning the popular music competition. If Dalton Harris wins he will become the 1st Jamaican and 1st Caribbean to ever win the competition.

Even if he does not win, he has made the biggest impression on this year’s competition and is now one of the most memorable performers that has ever performed. Dalton, coming from poverty, child abuse and having to fend for himself from the age of 15, was discovered by veteran producer Donovan Germaine who took him under his wings and recorded some songs with.

Although Harris won Jamaica’s premiere talent competition “Rising Stars”, he did not see the success of any kind. Germaine made sure he finished high school and much was not heard from Harris on the scene until he auditioned for the X-Factor. He has been the best week by week, creating fans throughout UK, Jamaica, the Jamaican Diaspora and the world. He has shown incredible humility and effortless skill throughout the competition. The judges gush over him amazed that such talent had not already been discovered and showcased across the world.

Dalton has shown that he deserves to be a star in entertainment. Sunday, Dalton Harris could create history.

Usain Bolt Statue

SPORTS LEGEND USAIN BOLT STANDS BEFORE STATUE IN KINGSTON, JAMAICA

The Minister of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport, the Honourable Olivia Grange, had said that “rain or shine, we will be unveiling the Usain Bolt statue” on Sunday, December 3. Without the rain the unveiling did occur on time

The Minister made the declaration on Wednesday after visiting the site on Statue Road in Independence Park where the sculpture will be mounted.

Usain Bolt & Statue

The Minister went to the Independence Park complex (which houses the National Stadium) to observe work on the pedestal on which the bronze statue — to the scale of one and quarter life size — will be mounted. Minister Grange said: “The base is now ready for mounting of the statue. The statue will be mounted and will be in place for Sunday, December 3.”

The statue — a lasting tribute to the world’s greatest sprinter — was due to be unveiled during Heritage Week in October, but the unveiling ceremony was postponed because of rain. Prime Minister, the Most Honourable Andrew Holness, unveiled the statue in a special ceremony scheduled at 5:30 on Sunday afternoon.

The ceremony was be attended by several notable figures in local and international sports.

Statue of Usain Bolt

The sculpture was designed by renowned Jamaican sculptor Basil Watson. It is the first of four statues of national sports stars that were commissioned by the Ministry of Culture, Gender, Entertainment and Sport under the Jamaica 55 Legacy Programme. Watson is also working on sculptures of Shelly Ann Fraser Pryce, Veronica Campbell Brown and Asafa Powell. The Minister invited the public to attend the unveiling ceremony.

Immediately following the unveiling of the statue, there was a special Reception of Appreciation for Jamaican athletes (a private event). Minister Grange said the Reception was for members of the Jamaican team that participated at the IAAF World Championship in London earlier this year as well as for “our Olympians in general – just to say thank you for how they’ve represented Jamaica over the years and for being good ambassadors.”

Courtesy of JIS

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Respect to Africans throughout the Caribbean and the rest of the world who fought against the holocaust of slavery. The fight led to the end of the evil system. Unfortunately the affects are still seen today and have evolved in different ways.

 

JAMAICA FLAG

HAPPY BIRTHDAY JAMAICA LAND OF MY BIRTH
 
BY Jason Walker
 
Today JAMAICA is 53. It is a moment of blessing and happiness for those of us born in, descendant of and love Jamaica. It is also a time to share that happiness with those who love Jamaica although not born in the land of wood and water. There are many reasons to be proud of our young small nation and the peoples who have been brought forth from this nation that have put a stamp on human history. All this has been done while facing seemingly insurmountable odds from the first moment Europeans destroyed the aboriginal people in Jamaica, to the Africans fighting against slavery and having limited success against the most far-reaching holocaust in human history, to the influencing of PAn African thought through Marcus Garvey & Rastafarians and the infectuous Reggae music and powerful contirbutions in the areas of human rights, progressive thought, academia, Christian service, athletics and so much more.
 
We have done all this while dealing with challenges from both outside and inside of our communities and creating a Diaspora that by all estimates doubles our population on the island. I would like to see as a present on this 53rd year, all Jamaicans really coming together with a mindset of always supporting people and things Jamaican in positive realms and to use all these areas of GODly anointing that we show so successfully to truly make us advance in every area so that we not only benefit ourselves, but the whole human race.
 
Happy Birthday Jamaica to all Jamaicans, those of Jamaican descent and those who love Jamaica
 
National Pledge
 
Before God and all mankind, 
I pledge the love and loyalty of my heart, 
the wisdom and courage of my mind, 
the strength and vigour of my body in the service of my fellow citizens; 
I promise to stand up for Justice, Brotherhood and Peace, 
to work diligently and creatively, 
to think generously and honestly, 
so that Jamaica may, under God, 
increase in beauty, fellowship and prosperity, 
and play her part in advancing the welfare of the whole human race.

 

Emancipation Park statues representing Africans looking to the sky after Emancipation declared throughout the British Empire in 1834

Emancipation Park statues representing Africans looking to the sky after Emancipation declared throughout the British Empire in 1834

(I originally wrote this piece a few years ago, still seems to make sense to me)

By Jason Walker

Emancipation day is an important day for the descendants of Africa, especially those whose ancestors were impacted by the brutal Slave trade. In the 1800’s the holocaust of slavery was hit with a crippling blow around the world. The Emancipation Act was passed on July 31, 1834 throughout the British Empire and effectively ended the inhumane Slave Trade. Full freedom from slavery did not come until four years later on August 1, 1838.  The 4 year period was instituted as a transition period as this monumental change would irrevocably change societies worldwide. The abolition of Slavery in the British Empire would affect slavery everywhere mainly because Britain’s navy owned the seas and without the cooperation of the British Navy, it made slavery both difficult and expensive. And as destructive, dehumanizing and inhumane the European version of the system of slavery was; it was for all intents and purposes an economic manifestation.

Slavery was a cruel and destructive system that had Africans as free labourers in labour intensive industries such as Cotton, Sugar and Tobacco. Throughout the 1400’s through to the middle of the 1700’s products such as these fetched a very attractive price, along with the free labour, a tidy profit could be made. Although labour was free, the cost to keep Africans enslaved was high. Especially in areas where there were slaves freeing themselves and staging revolts. The most successful of these of course included the Maroons in Jamaica from the 1500’s through to the 1700’s and even more so the Africans (including Maroons) in Haiti who at the end of the 1700’s would successfully wage a revolution against French armies, supported by Spain and England.

Do not think though that the Emancipation act came about from any suddenly altruistic gestures by the British Monarchy. Due to the work of many abolitionists in Britain; the sentiment against the horrific system Slavery had grown tremendously among the English population. Also the prices of the aforementioned products began to drop on the world markets as new products that did not need this labour intensive situation were now rising to prominence. Along with that came the advent of the industrial age which was ushering a new era where such labour numbers were not the order of the day. All the aforementioned along with the cost of keeping control and responding to revolts made these endeavours non-attractive. Continuing the genocidal and devastating system Slavery no longer made economic sense.

As we come to the present, we find that it is only in the past two decades that countries have decided to mark this date as a holiday, and of the countries that were affected by this act (Countries in Africa, The Caribbean, Central America, South America, & North America) a small percentage actually commemorate this day*. Maybe that is appropriate; I say this because although things are different from the era of slavery, people of African descent in the aforementioned geographical areas are not in a position of true emancipation.

The definition of Emancipation from the English Oxford Dictionary states that it is “the fact or process of being set free from legal, social, or political restrictions; liberation:” With the majority of African persons in these areas lacking resources, political clout, and in some cases freedom, can we really call ourselves emancipated? It was probably this same observation that led former Prime Minister of Jamaica and former leader of the Non-Aligned Movement (a coalition of countries that were not listed as industrial nations) Michael Manley to say; “The enslavement of the body which endured till 1838 was nothing compared to the enslavement of the mind which persisted since”. The affects of slavery and the propaganda to support slavery has endured and left a lasting mark and has conspired to keep those of African descent in such a position.

Yet by our accomplishments singularly and in some rare cases collectively we see we are a very powerful people. So it is possible to change the current existence. However we will probably have to do what Reggae Superstar Bob Marley said in his song Redemption Song: “Emancipate Yourself From Mental Slavery” before we can truly be at a stage of Emancipation. So although we celebrate the Act that saw fruition on August 1 1838 annually, we should probably use these days to see where we are on the road of getting to the next stage of Emancipation and be creative in getting to that new stage.

*Countries that Celebrate Emancipation Day include: Jamaica, Barbados, Bermuda, Bahamas, St. Lucia, Canada, Guyana, St. Vincent & the Grenadines, Grenada, Trinidad & Tobago, Turks & Caicos, Anguilla, British Virgin Islands, Dominica, St. Kitts & Nevis