Posts Tagged ‘USA’

Jamaica vs USA in the Gold Cup Final 2017

 

United States vs. Jamaica
2017 Gold Cup Final
Levi’s Stadium – Santa Clara, Calif.
Wednesday, July 26 – 9:30 p.m. ET
WATCH: FS1, Univision, UDN (USA) | TSN 1/3/4/5 (CAN)

 

This was the final that was not expected by any of the media pundits. They did not expect Jamaica to be in the final. That is understandable though, Jamaica’s Reggae Boyz came into the final with none of their established leaders or stars and had a starting team that mainly had either been on the bench that last Gold Cup run or had not even been on the team. Whereas Mexico and USA who have been the longstanding giants of Concacaf were expected to be the finalist. The two giant countries; more resourced, experienced and with decorated players had been the script and narrative to be the finalists.

Jamaica has shocked the football world by making it to the finals, again. We will see who comes out as the victor tonight!

 

 

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Miami Broward One Carnival Celebrate 30 years of Carnival in South Florida

By Jason Walker

MIAMI BROWARD CARNIVAL CELEBRATES 30 YEARS

MIAMI BROWARD ONE CARNIVAL CELEBRATES 30 YEARS. PHOTO COURTESY OF MIAMI BROWARD ONE CARNIVAL

Miami Broward One Carnival reaches a major milestone in 2014. Three decades is a long time for any area not based in the Caribbean to host the largest physical manifestation of Caribbean culture: Carnival. The name Miami Broward One Carnival reflects the historic unification of two Carnivals that were staged for several years in close proximity in South Florida, on the same day at the same time. Both events drew thousands of people and had stage shows and bands.  The people, however, wanted one Carnival for the sake of unity, – everyone could partake in all that Carnival has to offer.

The vision of Carnival in South Florida 30 years ago has manifested itself into one of the most popular Caribbean events in North America. The Carnival even has hit songs that are about that Carnival, such as Alison Hind’s “Never Too Late For Carnival” featuring Trevor Offkey.

Joan Hickson is the chair of the organizing committee. Hickson thought back to “the first Carnival on NW 183rd Street.  I was a member of the St. Lucia Association of South Florida.  We became a band in the Carnival.  I was actually the Queen of the Band one year.  Since that time I have been involved in other bands – D’ Untouchables and D’ First Dimension.  I was on the Board of the South Florida Bandleaders Association and Caribbean American Carnival, which later became Miami Carnival Inc.  I have loved almost every minute of the last 30 years.  It is an accomplishment that we were able to overcome everything and all come together to continue this beautiful event”.

YOUNG ONE IN COSTUME FOR JUNIOR CARNIVAL

YOUNG ONE IN COSTUME FOR JUNIOR CARNIVAL

Hickson also demonstrated the importance of joining both Miami and Broward Carnivals; “it is very important for us to have only one Carnival in this region”, she cited.  “History has proven that we cannot afford more than one – financially, culturally or socially.  It was hard for both organizations; we were accustomed to our independence, but as leaders of our community it was the only choice and it was the right choice.”

Kathryn D’arcy is a director on the organizing committee. D’arcy shared that this year the “theme is a celebration of the 30th Annual Miami Carnival.  The first Miami Carnival was in 1985 in what is now the City of Miami Gardens.”

The late Selman Lewis took the helm of leadership in 1990 and with great fortitude, cunning, will power and strong support helped to guide the Carnival to be one of the most recognized in the world.

Miami Broward One Carnival by Walter Drayton

IMAGES FROM CARNIVAL IN SOUTH FLORIDA BY WALTER DRAYTON

Getting to the milestone of 30 years is very important and has been very difficult. The Carnival organizing committee has to make sure all facets of the very large event are taken care of, that there is buy in from the non-Caribbean community, the governing municipalities of South Florida, and the other Carnivals to avoid conflicting schedules. D’arcy shared that doing this “is a personal triumph because of my history with Miami Carnival.  I was not there in 1985, but I was in 1986 and every year since.  I’ve been a bandleader, a mas player, a competitor, an onlooker and an organizer of Miami Carnival.  I have seen and been a part of different facets of Carnival and from an organizational perspective I’ve seen every problem, every triumph over adversity – and there have been a lot of them.”

The Director of Marketing, John Beckford (formerly part of the Broward Carnival organizing committee), states that the Carnival means to him “embracing heritage and celebration of Caribbean arts and culture. It means food, drinks and music indigenous to the Caribbean. It means, getting together with friends and family if not for this one time each year…it means old man Winter is about to set in….” Hickson declares that, “I have loved almost every minute of the last 30 years.  It is an accomplishment that we were able to overcome everything and all come together to continue this beautiful event.”

For it to last this long and still grow and be relevant is admirable, the question as to how it has lasted so long was posed to Hickson.  She responded by saying “Our community loves Carnival.  No matter where we are from, we all had Carnival at home, so it’s natural to want to show our kids and teach them our culture.  Every year another thousand people discover Carnival and will bring their friends the following year.”

Broward Canrival

IMAGES FROM BROWARD CARNIVAL

Miami Broward One Carnival has left enduring memories for all, memories that have seared into people’s subconscious to become lasting life images. Board members shared some of their memories; Beckford shared his most enduring memory which was a “A quiet conversation with Selman Lewis two days before he died, about how unity of Miami & Broward carnivals was the right thing to do…. Selman….miss him….”; Hickson adds, “… the memories of Selman Lewis are there. We called him “The Runner” because the rest of the Board had specific responsibilities but he was, overall, responsible for everything.  Plus, Selman was too elegant to ever run. The name was our private joke.  I always loved seeing the Kings, Queens and Individuals on stage, especially when we did the show at the Coconut Grove Convention Center and they had a big stage to perform on.  The Junior Carnivals are good memories.  I loved it when the steelbands came from T&T and people just chipped along smiling and happy.” D’arcy remembers “Wet Mih Down” playing while masqueraders jumped up on stage in pouring rain in Miami Beach; sitting on the wall of Hialeah Park watching the masqueraders pass; the heat at  carnival parties in Studio 183 and Travelodge; Sherman Helmsley (“Mr. Jefferson”) jumping up on stage at the Convention Center; a City of Miami Policeman pushing pan on stage at Bicentennial Park; TanTan and Saga Boy at Pier 1 in Miami Beach; the perfection of D’ First Dimension Mas Band; all mas bands, steelbands, Junior bands and J’Ouvert bands that make up Carnival.”

The Carnival brings thousands of persons to South Florida consistently from across North and South America, the Caribbean, Africa and even Europe. It is a huge boost to the South Florida economy, a great plug for Florida tourism and a fantastic display of Caribbean Culture. Caribbean and Non-Caribbean people get engaged in the Carnival in diverse ways. They are not just standing on the sides and grooving to music anymore, they are becoming a part of the show joining bands, putting on costumes and fully becoming part of the Carnival. There are Caribbean and non-Caribbean people volunteering to help with the organizing of the Carnival. According to Beckford, “some embrace carnival and are curious of the diversity. Thanks to TV, Internet and World Travel, more non-Caribbean folks explore and embrace Carnival. Each year I see non-Caribbean numbers grow in attendance”

Kia Hidspire representing Grenada & St Lucia along with Nicole Williams representing Jamaica in Tribal Mas Band in the 2013 Miami Broward Carnival

Kia Hidspire representing Grenada & St Lucia along with Nicole Williams representing Jamaica in Tribal Mas Band in the 2013 Miami Broward Carnival

There are many aspects for people to enjoy and be engaged in. Patron and Reveller Nicole Williams who makes the trek from New York City states that “my favourite part would be the beginning when we start to march”; Miami Native Rhavi Bharath eloquently points out that “the Carnival bliss in that moment of sweet soca, alcohol, stunning women and scenic ecstasy was a time forever etched in my subconscious.” There are also masquerade bands that will travel thousands of miles to partake of Miami Broward One Carnival. Garth George and his Fusion Karnival Band out of New York is such band. According to Trinidad & Tobago born George Fusion Karnival masquerade band is one of the largest to come out of New York and he states that “Miami Broward (One) Carnival is the last bacchanal getaway of the summer before the main event in T&T to get ready again for another year”.

The Carnival engages various people in many areas. When asked about this phenomenon D’arcy expounds that “there are cashiers, Marshalls to direct the parade, people to work with the vendors, marketing needs people to service the sponsors, we have PR volunteers tweeting and instagramming at every event.  These are just some of the people who work with Carnival.  From an attendance point-of-view, it’s exciting to see the promise of diversity play out on our stage.  Every color, creed and race is on the road, but in addition the age differential is amazing in that nobody is too young or too old to play mas.  We have masqueraders in wheelchairs; we have LGBT masqueraders; anyone and everyone is welcome as a masquerader or attendee.  We are truly diverse and that is the true pageantry and spectacle of Carnival.”

Looking back at the three decades it is hard to separate Selman Lewis from the memories. Hickson shared that “Selman Lewis is the cerebral founder of Carnival.  The WIADCA Committee founded Carnival in 1985.  In 1990 Selman Lewis took the Carnival and dragged it to a higher level.  He formed alliances which brought Brooklyn and other cities to Miami in record numbers.  He started the Coconut Grove Convention Center parties.  He started doing a Carnival Launch.  He then started doing an Official Launch of Miami Carnival in T&T.  He was the brainchild behind the beautiful brochures which many Carnival produce.  He had a unique mind and the ability to communicate which allowed him to dominate every meeting and every group, and to get people to agree with his viewpoints.  He formed the first “Junior Board” with the intent of having a group of younger people to take over Carnival.  His policies and procedures are still used today.  He was a Carnival Genius.”

Miami Broward One Carnival celebrating 30 years should be a powerful display of Caribbean culture, expression and, yes, unity. The Carnival will be in two parts the Miami Broward Junior Carnival will be held on Sunday, October 5, 2014 at the Central Broward Regional Park & Cricket Stadium (3700 NW 11th Pl, Lauderhill, FL 33311) and on Sunday, October 12, 2014 there will be the staging of the Miami Broward Parade of Bands, 30 Years Celebration at the Miami-Dade County Fairgrounds, 10901 Coral Way, Miami, Fl 33165. For more information visit www.miamibrowardcarnival.com.

Jason Walker is a freelance writer for Caribbean Today Magazine who has had an award winning journalism career that spans 20 years. He can be followed on twitter at www.twitter.com/jasonwalker_ or emailed at jasonarticle@gmail.com

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Trinidadian Born Miami Native Rhavi Bharath with fellow Masquerader overlooking Biscayne Bay in Miami

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA ON CARIBBEAN AMERICAN HERITAGE MONTH 2013

President Barack Obama flanked by Prime Minister Portia Simpson-Miller of Jamaica (Left) and Prime Minister Kamla Persad-Bissessar of Trinidad & Tobago (Right) along with several Caribbean and Regional heads

President Barack Obama flanked by Prime Minister Portia Simpson-Miller of Jamaica (Left) and Prime Minister Kamla Persad-Bissessar of Trinidad & Tobago (Right) along with several Caribbean and Regional heads

“For centuries, the United States and nations in the Caribbean have grown alongside each other as partners in progress. Separated by sea but united by a yearning for independence, our countries won the right to chart their own destinies after generations of colonial rule. Time and again, we have led the way to a brighter future together — from lifting the stains of slavery and segregation to widening the circle of opportunity for our sons and daughters.

“National Caribbean-American Heritage Month is a time to celebrate those enduring achievements. It is also a chance to recognize men and women who trace their roots to the Caribbean. Through every chapter of our Nation’s history, Caribbean Americans have made our country stronger — reshaping our politics and reigniting the arts, spurring our movements and answering the call to serve. Caribbean traditions have enriched our own, and woven new threads into our cultural fabric. Again and again, Caribbean immigrants and their descendants have reaffirmed America’s promise as a land of opportunity — a place where no matter who you are or where you come from, you can make it if you try.

“Together, as a Nation of immigrants, we will keep writing that story. And alongside our partners throughout the Caribbean, we will keep working to achieve inclusive economic growth, access to clean and affordable energy, enhanced security, and lasting opportunity for all our people. As we honor Caribbean Americans this month, let us strengthen the ties that bind us as members of the Pan American community, and let us resolve to carry them forward in the years ahead.

“NOW, THEREFORE, I, BARACK OBAMA, President of the United States of America, by virtue of the authority vested in me by the Constitution and the laws of the United States, do hereby proclaim June 2013 as National Caribbean-American Heritage Month. I encourage all Americans to celebrate the history and culture of Caribbean Americans with appropriate ceremonies and activities.

“IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand this thirty-first day of May, in the year of our Lord two thousand thirteen, and of the Independence of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-seventh.

“BARACK OBAMA.”

PHOTO CAPTION: President Barack Obama flanked by Prime Minister Portia Simpson-Miller of Jamaica (Left) and Prime Minister Kamla Persad-Bissessar of Trinidad & Tobago (Right) along with several Caribbean and Regional heads

Jamaica beats USA in Football World Cup Qualifier
David topples Goliath
Friday the 7th of September 2012 will go down in Caribbean sports history in infamy. On a lukewarm evening in Jamaica at Independence Park, also known as the National Stadium and popularly known as the “Office”, The US national football team lost for the first time in 43 years to a Caribbean team in a game that mattered. Jamaica’s Reggae Boyz had defeated the regional super power after 90 minutes of solid play, scoring 2 goals to 1.
There were immediate celebrations at the stadium, throughout the city of Kingston, throughout Jamaica and several places in the Diaspora wherever Jamaicans were. The Euphoria extended far and wide as social media and other internet manifestations were ablaze with celebratory posts about the game.
You ask yourself why this was so important and we are not even in the final stage of the World Cup in 2014, much less in the finals? Well to answer that question one has to look at various factors.
• One factor is history. AS mentioned before The United States has not lost a game that mattered to Caribbean nation in 43 years. That was a 1-0 s loss to Haiti on May 11 back in 1969. The United States lost to Trinidad & Tobago 2-1 in 2008 however the US had already advanced to the next round. The United States stepped into the game having only 4 points in the round and as such needing to add to their point total since this was the half way point of this round
• In 18 tries Jamaica had never won over the US. There were several draws through these periods.
• Of the roughly 40 countries in the region, the United States has perennially been the number 2 team behind Mexico (One of the World’s best teams).
• The US put and has considerable resources to put towards their football program which creates platforms for raising the quality of the team. There is no other country in the region that has the ability to throw such resources to their football programs. The US being an economic powerhouse gives the country an extreme advantage to draw and naturalize some of the best players in the world, pay some of the best teams to play against their team to elevate the quality of the National side, and to build a powerful football program from the ground (children) up.
• Also on the Jamaican side the coach Theodore Whitmore and most of the players come from very humble beginnings and became stars in Jamaica and not outside Jamaica, showing that the little island is able to produce international level competitors and does not need to depend on the outside.
• The US has qualified several times for the final stage of the World Cup. Jamaica has only done so once
• And yes 2012 marks Jamaica’s 50th Year of Independence. Also the game follows a historic performance by the Jamaica Olympics team in the London Olympics of 2012.
As such we are going to hear the saying “David slays Goliath”, “Small Axe Falls Big Tree” and of course “we might be small but we Tallawah”! The US was without a couple of their stars, but so was Jamaica. The US still had Tim Howard, one of the best goalies in the world and Clinton Dempsey who turned out to be one of the best scorers in the world. As for Jamaica, Luton Shelton is a home grown scoring machine who scored the winning goal with Rudolph Austin who scored and destroyed the mid field. Goalie Dwayne Miller needs special mention for great play.
In terms of the rest of the round Jamaica plays the United States on Tuesday September 11, followed by Antigua & Barbuda and then Guatemala. We should survive and advance. However whether we win or lose the next US game we must never forget how special and beautiful this victory at home over the US was.
Congrats Reggae Boyz!
Jason Walker

Jamaica VS USA World Cup Qualifier in Kingston

In a David vs Goliath clash Jamaica is taking on the one of the region;s powerhouses in Football in the US. The game will be played at home in the “Office” AKA the National Stadium Today Friday September 7. This is a World Cup Qualifier where Jamaica is tied atop their group with the USA.

Jamaica VS USA Courtesy of Cocacaf


Below are reports from Jamaica Football Federation and Concacaf

Darren Mattocks, the most exciting first year player in the MLS and the man considered the leading candidate for rookie of the year award in the league, was yesterday named to a Reggae Boyz squad of 24 for an encounter with the United States in group World Cup qualifier at ‘the Office on Friday September 7.

The soon to be 22-year-old made his national team debut on August 15 in a friendly international against El Salvador coming on as second half substitute in Jamaica’s 2-0 win. While he did not find the back of the net Mattocks, has an excellent record as a goal scorer, finding the target 39 times from 47 appearances for Akron University over a two-year period.
His outstanding performances saw him being drafted by the Vancouver Whitecaps in January with the second overall pick in the 2012 MLS SuperDraft. The skillful and speedy six-footer has not disappointed scoring seven goals in 13 games, the most for his team and the most as a rookie. He has taken the second most shots for his team and has 14 shots in all on goal for a conversion rate of 50 per cent of shots on goal.

Also included in the squad is the country’s new central defensive pair of Reading’s Adrian Mariappa and Watford’s Nyron Nosworthy. Both played together at Watford before Mariappa’s off-season move to the Premier League club. Both made their national debut together in a 1-0 win over Guyana at the Catherine Hall Stadium. This encounter will mark their fifth game together for the country.

Rodolph Austin, who earned the status of cult hero after just one game for Leeds United with a performance which saw him bossing the midfield breaking up tackles, spraying passes forward and testing the opposing goalkeeper with a few long-ranged shots, is also included and is expected to be the engine of the team’s midfield.

The Turkey-based Luton Shelton after his double strike against El Salvador, his first goals since the Gold Cup last June, should be full of confidence and eager to extend his record as the country’s leading scorer. His partnership with Ryan Johnson, the man who assisted on both of his strikes against El Salvador should also serve the team well.

Jamaica are seeking to take over the leadership of group A as despite the fact that both teams are on four points after two games in the four-team group, they are being edged out of first place by the United States which have a superior goal difference.

The full squad: Goalkeepers – Dwayne Miller (Syrianska, Sweden), Duwayne Kerr (Strommen, Norway), Jacomeno Barrett (Montego Bay United, Jamaica); Defenders – Jermaine Taylor (Houston Dynamo USA), Adrian Mariappa (Reading FC England), Dicoy Williams (Toronto FC, Canada), Andrae Campbell (Nottodden SK, Norway), Nyron Nosworthy (Watford FC England), Shavar Thomas (Montreal Impact Canada), Lovel Palmer (Portland Timbers USA), O’Brian Woodbine (VPS Vaasa Finland); Midfielders – Rodolph Austin (Leeds, England), Je-Vaughn Watson (Houston Dynamo, USA), Errol Stevens (Arnett Gardens FC, Jamaica), Jason Morrison (Aalesund, Norway), Ewan Grandison (Portmore United Jamaica), Joel Senior (Harbour View Jamaica); Forwards – Luton Shelton (Karabukspor), Turkey, Ryan Johnson (Toronto FC, Canada), Kavin Bryan (Vicem Hai Phong, Vietnam), Dane Richards (Vancouver Whitecaps Canada), Omar Cummings (Colorado Rapids UA), Tramaine Stewart (Aalesund Norway), Darren Mattocks (Vancouver Whitecaps Canada)

By Michael Lewis
CONCACAF.com

KINGSTON, Jamaica – Winless in 18 tries against the United States, Jamaica is determined to see that streak end – and do it in World Cup qualifying.

Tied with the Americans atop Group A in the CONCACAF semifinal round of qualifying with four points apiece, Jamaica can also boost its chances of reaching the final round of qualifying with a win Friday night.

The U.S. limps in without two key players, midfielders Landon Donovan and Michael Bradley, and their most dangerous attacker, Clint Dempsey not match fit. It only adds to the Jamaicans’ confidence.

“Even if those guys were in the lineup, I still think we can beat them,” Jamaica striker Ryan Johnson said. “They’re human, just like the rest of us. It’s all about the team that comes out to play on that day because anything can happen.

“I am very confident in the players that we have here. A lot of people know us. A lot of people still don’t know about a lot of players on our team and how really good they are. It’s on us to show it on that day. There’s been a lot of talk leading up to this game. But now is the time for us to show. ”

In fact, the Jamaica feels this is its time to qualify for their second World Cup, joining the group that went to France in 1998.

“A lot of players are in their prime,” Johnson said. “We just have a good team. We have everything that we need. We have speed, we have technical ability, experience. Those are the main things you need to be a good football team. We have everything. It’s all about of us executing on that day. . . .. I don’t think they’re a better team than us on paper.”

Forward Omar Cummings said coach Theodore Whitmore has prepared the team for this moment.

“A lot of people don’t recognize with what we’ve done or the accomplishments that we’ve made over the last couple of years,” he said.

For the Americans, they have never won a qualifier in Jamaica, trying all four matches – including three goalless draws.

“We are prepared. We are ready to do the job on Friday,” Whitmore said. “We can expect a tough game from the U.S. team on Friday night. We have to be organized and keep the ball and take our chances.”

The last time these two teams met, the United States won 2-0 in the 2011 CONCACAF Gold Cup quarterfinals.

“It was a lot of lessons,” Whitmore said. “We know what cost us the game against this U.S. team in the Gold Cup. Bradley was the one who dominated the game against us in the Gold Cup. Unfortunately, he’s out.”

A win would help the Caribbean side in many ways, from confidence to being more settled for Tuesday’s rematch in Columbus, Ohio.

“If we can take care of business here, the game coming up it could take the pressure off us a little bit,” Johnson said. “If we win this game, maybe we can go into the U.S. and get a point. If we win again, that would be huge.”

It also would have some ancillary benefits.

“It would be a gift for us to celebrate our 50th year,” Whitmore said, referring to the 50th anniversary of Jamaica’s independence from Britain this year.

Anniversary celebrations were held at National Stadium, the Reggae Boyz’ home field, which is better known to fans as The Office. The Jamaicans held a 50-game unbeaten streak at the stadium from 1995-2001 and opponents still find it a difficult place to play.

“In any office, the boss is in charge,” Whitmore said. “That’s how we get the name The Office because we are hard to beat here, especially in my time. We want to maintain that.”

Jamaica Prime Minister NO SHOW at Jamaica Diaspora Event

by Jason Walker

               I know when you hear the words “No Show” they are normally associated with entertainers and concerts not Prime Ministers especially when it involves important audiences like the Diaspora. Well that is essentially what occurred on December 3 2011 in the state of Florida when Jamaican Florida Commissioner Dale Holness had arranged for a meeting between the very new Jamaican Prime Minister Andrew Holness (Distant cousins) and the Jamaican Diaspora.

Let’s do a little a background Prime Minister (PM) Holness was sworn in as PM on the 23rd of October 2011 and as such became the youngest PM in Jamaican history. This brought intrigue and excitement in several quarters, and also extreme curiousity. There were questions throughout the Diaspora as to who exactly is Jamaican Prime Minister Andrew Holness as a large percentage of the Diaspora was very unfamiliar with the new PM. To add to the fascination, former Prime Minister Bruce Golding had suddenly resigned amid a series of scandals that rocked the ruling party, the Jamaica Labour Party (JLP). To add to this earlier this year members of the Diaspora had shown a very public concern about the treatment of the Diaspora by the Jamaican government led by the JLP.

With the aforementioned reasons amongst others many members of the Diaspora jumped at the chance to meet the new PM face to face, they came from all over Florida and as far as the neighbouring states to Florida. The event was to start at 3:30 PM in the very large Christway Baptist Church in Miramar Florida. Hundreds of Jamaicans had already begun filling up the venue, surrounding parking lots were packed. Jamaicans of all stripes, classes and other strata were streaming in. Some identified themselves as PNP (People’s National Party the opposition) supporters, Independents and JLP supporters (wearing green in some part of their dress), the majority though seemed to be made up of independents who just love Jamaica. The general mood was they wanted to find out who their new PM was, to share Diaspora concerns and to hear the PM’s vision for a Jamaica.

3:30 came and went, 4:00 came and went and there was no Prime Minister. The audience was told repeatedly that the PM was on the way. Persons such as G2K vice president Sherman Calnek and the hilarious community member Easton Lee went on the podium to fill the time. Right before 5:00 it was announced that we would be hearing from the PM calling in on his SAT phone calling from his plane as it was taking off from Jamaica, yes I said taking off from Jamaica minutes to 5:00 when the event started at 3:00. The PM apologized for not being there and that he would be on the way. It was announced that he should be there soon. After 6:30 with no PM in sight Diaspora members began leaving in disgust, so disappointed that a promise made by the new Prime Minister was treated with such disrespect. Soon after when most of the Jamaicans from the Diaspora had left the event was cancelled.

Before the cancellation was made known, it was announced that later that night there was a fundraiser for the Jamaica Labour Party election campaign that persons could attend and meet the PM there. Understandably only JLP supporters were interested in such an activity while the invitation and no show left a bitter taste in people’s mouths.

Kudos must be given to Commissioner Dale Holness for arranging this event, for Jamaicans throughout the Diaspora still want to know who the man who is running the country they love is. Former Prime Ministers Michael Manley, Edward Seaga, PJ Patterson, Portia Simpson-Miller and Bruce Golding have a strong and positive record when it comes to making time for and honouring meeting engagements with the Diaspora. From here on in, if Prime Minister Holness wishes to interact with the Jamaican Diaspora, market to them and have them invest in Jamaica as he shared in a later interview, he is going to have to show some priority with the Diaspora when it comes to his scheduling. What happened on Saturday has been taken as a slap in the face by several who attended, even those who identified themselves as JLP supporters looked stunned and definitely disappointed as they left.